Blueberry pierogi (pierogi z jagodami)

Blueberry pierogi are the fruit version of one of Poland’s culinary landmarks: pierogi, Polish dumplings. A sweet delicious blueberry filling is the star in these fruit pierogi, usually served with sour cream and sugar. Is this dessert? I’d have pierogi with blueberries as a main, but they can surely work as dessert, too. Here’s how to make sweet pierogi with step by step photos.

Polish cuisine might not be the most exclusive or the most popular in the world, but it does have its fair share of foods that everybody knows. Pierogies are the brightest star. But they are mostly renown for their savoury fillings:

  • cheese and potatoes (pierogi ruskie)
  • meat (pierogi z mięsem)
  • mushroom and cabbage (pierogi z grzybami i kapustą)

And this is just to name a few. But have you ever heard of pierogi z jagodami (blueberry pierogi)?

Fruit pierogi

Fruit pierogi are somewhat more niche. Yet some low key restaurants and milk bars feature them on the menu. Babcia Malina – one of my recommendations on places to have Polish food in Krakow – has some wicked wild strawberry pierogi.

Those that we ate the most at home, though, were pierogi with blueberries. Blueberry pierogies just have to be my favourite type of fruit pierogi.

Tin mug filled with fresh bilberries.

How to make fresh blueberry pierogi

Making homemade blueberry pierogi is rather easy and does not require a lot of expensive ingredients. In fact, if you can go blueberry picking somewhere near, you’ve got the main ingredient covered for free!

The other ingredients you will need are:

  • Flour
  • Salt
  • Sugar
  • Potato starch
  • Water
  • Vegetable oil
  • Sour cream

Here’s the blueberry pierogi recipe with step by step instructions and pictures. For detailed quantities, please refer to the recipe card below. Since the dough works best when slightly sticky, we don’t want to let it dry as we make the filling, so that will have to be the first thing we prepare.

Bowl of blueberries, bowl of suga andpotato starch on a teaspoon.

Blueberry pierogi filling

  • Combine the blueberries, sugar and potato starch in a bowl and toss. Be gentle with the blueberries and try not to squash them. Being combined with sugar they will release some juice, but we are adding the starch to help absorb it.

Can I use frozen blueberries? Yes, of course. Although I mostly make blueberry pierogi as an excuse to use up the blueberries I harvest in the forest, I have made pierogi with frozen blueberries. My recommendation would be to not thaw, but toss with sugar and starch when frozen.

Even if sugar-coating them frozen, blueberries thaw rather quickly at room temperature. Thawed blueberries will release even more juice than fresh ones do, so be very careful when filling the pierogi. Some juice may leak and stain the edges of your pierogi purple. As long as you properly pinch the pierogi sealed, that’s no big deal. In fact, I quite like those that are slightly purple.

blueberry pierogi
This was an old batch I had made with frozen blueberries. Expect your hands to get the same colour as those edges.

How to make pierogi dough

Pierogi dough has 2 characteristics: it is made with boiling water and it is quite hard to knead. But don’t worry, you don’t need to knead it when you add the hot water, so there is no burning hazard as long as you handle the kettle safely. Here’s how to do it:

  • Sift the flour and salt into a large mixing bowl.
  • Pour in the boiling water and stir energetically with a fork. Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let the dough rest 5 minutes.
  • Pour in the cold water and stir. The dough should still look pretty crumbly. Cover again and let the dough rest 15 minutes.
  • Pour in the vegetable oil and transfer the dough to a working surface. Knead the dough for 7-8 minutes until you get a uniform ball.
  • Cut out about 1/3 of the dough and roll it out on a floured surface. Make sure to not turn the sheet of dough at any time, as you want to make sure that the side facing up stays sticky.
  • Cut out circles with a cookie cutter or the rim of a glass.
  • Since the pierogi dough is rather hard to roll out, I usually get to 2-3 mm, cut out the circles, then roll those even thinner until the dough is about 1 mm thick.
  • Repeat until you have portioned out all of the dough and you have about 30 thin pastry circles.
Rolling out pierogi dough.
Roll out, cut out, roll out some more for a thinner circle.

How to assemble blueberry pierogi

  • Have one dough circle in the palm of one hand and add about 1 tbsp of filling to it.
  • Fold the pierogi trapping the filling inside, pressing the edges of the dough to close it in. Watch out for juice leakage, try to keep the pierogi horizontal.
  • To tighten the seal and give a nice finish, pinch the edges between your fingers.
  • Place your unbaked pierogies on a tray lined with baking paper to prevent them from sticking to the surface they lay on.

Uncooked pierogi on a tray.

Help! My edges won’t stick together! If your dough has been sitting too long before you got to the filling part, the edges may not stick when pressed together. To avoid this problem you can:

  • lightly wet the edges to make them stickier by running a wet finger around the edge of the pastry circle;
  • work in batches: roll out one batch, fill it, then proceed rolling out another batch, and so on;
  • get an assistant and work as a team: one rolls out the dough, the other assembles. That’s how my grandma and my mom rolled!

Cooking and serving the blueberry pierogies

Pierogi cook like any type of fresh pasta in lightly salted boiling water. Add them to the boiling water and cook for 3-4 minutes, until they float. Cooking time depends on thickness of the dough – if yours is quite thick, you may need a couple of minutes more.

I recommend to cook the pierogi in batches and take the cooked ones out of the water using a skimmer. The use of a skimmer is recommended even if making just a small batch that fits the pot all at once. Cooked pierogi might be too soft to sustain draining through a colander like regular pasta.

Plate the cooked pierogi and top with sour cream and sugar. Smacznego!

Cooked blueberry pierogi served with sour cream.

More Polish desserts

If serving dumplings is not quite your idea of dessert but you want to try a Polish dessert, here are some other recipes you may be interested in:

  • Polish honey cake with semolina cream – this is my favourite Polish cake. Traditionally made with thin layers, I follow my grandma’s recipe for thick honey cake layers filled by her delicious semolina buttercream.
  • Polish apple and cocoa cake – inspired by a German recipe, this apple and cocoa cake is deliciously soft, making for the perfect cake to enjoy with a cup of coffee at breakfast.
  • Polish cheesecake with canned peaches – inspired by Polish cheesecake here comes this naturally gluten-free crustless ricotta cheesecake that is light and delightful!

While I did inherit a few recipes from my grandma’s cookbook, I do not have her recipe for pierogi dough. My reference has always been this pierogi dough recipe.

Have you ever tried fruit pierogi? Or pierogi with blueberries in particular? I would like to hear your thoughts on this Polish delicacy. Let me know in the comments! Don’t have what you need? Pin this recipe for later!

Originally published August 2015. Updated with new pictures in September 2020 and new text in April 2021.

Blueberry pierogi

Sweet fruit pierogi made from scratch. These homemade blueberry pierogies are served with sour cream and sugar. A delicious flavour variation of a Polish classic.

Course Dessert, Main Course
Cuisine Polish
Keyword blueberry pierogi, fruit pierogi, polish pierogi
Prep Time 40 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Servings 4 people
Calories 597 kcal
Author Eva | Electric Blue Food

Ingredients

  • 450 g flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 180 ml boiling water
  • 60 ml cold water
  • 1 tsp vegetable oil
  • 500 g blueberries
  • 2 tbsp potato starch
  • 6 tbsp sugar
  • 4 tbsp sour cream

Instructions

  1. To make the filling add the blueberries, sugar and potato starch in a bowl and toss to combine.

  2. To make the dough sift the flour and salt into a large mixing bowl.

  3. Pour in the boiling water and stir energetically with a fork. Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let the dough rest for 5 minutes.

  4. Pour in the cold water and stir. The dough should still look pretty crumbly. Cover again and let the dough rest for 15 minutes.

  5. Pour in the vegetable oil and transfer the dough to a working surface. Knead the work for 5-10 minutes until you get a uniform ball.

  6. Cut out about 1/3 of the dough and roll it out on a floured surface. Do not turn the dough as you want to keep one side sticky for easier assembling.

  7. Cut out circles with a cookie cutter or the rim of a glass. Roll out each circle individually to thin them until they are 1 mm thick.

  8. Have one dough circle in the palm of your hand and add about 1 tbsp of filling to it. Close the pierogi in half, pressing the edges of the dough to close it. Watch out for juice leakage.

  9. To tighten the seal and give a nice finish, pinch the edges between your fingers.

  10. Place your unbaked pierogies on a tray lined with baking paper to prevent them from sticking to the surface they lay on.

  11. Cook in boiling lightly salted water for 3-5 minutes until they float. Cooking time depends on thickness. Remove from boiling water using a skimmer.

  12. Plate the cooked pierogi and top with sour cream and extra sugar, if desired.

Recipe Notes

The nutrition information provided is only an estimate. The suggested serving size is meant if having blueberry pierogi as dessert.

Nutrition Facts
Blueberry pierogi
Amount Per Serving
Calories 597 Calories from Fat 45
% Daily Value*
Fat 5g8%
Saturated Fat 2g13%
Trans Fat 1g
Cholesterol 6mg2%
Sodium 309mg13%
Potassium 274mg8%
Carbohydrates 126g42%
Fiber 6g25%
Sugar 31g34%
Protein 13g26%
Vitamin A 142IU3%
Vitamin C 12mg15%
Calcium 42mg4%
Iron 6mg33%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

 

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8 Comments

  1. Ms.K August 18, 2015 at 09:16

    Interesting, looks delish too!

    Reply
    1. Eva August 18, 2015 at 09:18

      Thank you Ms.K 🙂

      Reply
  2. Chez @ Chez Moi August 18, 2015 at 10:43

    The purple colour bleeding out at the edges looks so pretty. I’m used to savoury dumplings so these fruit ones seem very different. I’d love to try them.

    Reply
    1. Eva August 18, 2015 at 11:43

      They’re relly good! Think dumplings, but with blueberry pie filling and you get the idea. You should definitely try them!!

      Reply
  3. J. Torres August 19, 2015 at 21:32

    These blueberry pierogies looks magical.
    It reminded me of the purple yams that I really love.

    Reply
    1. Eva August 19, 2015 at 21:37

      Hello!! I don’t know purple yams, I should make some research because now I’m curious. Can you please suggest me a link?

      Reply
        1. Eva August 19, 2015 at 22:03

          Wow, thanks, very interesting! What a stunning colour it has!

          Reply

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