Chasing ruins in Ireland: Churches, Castles and Cemeteries

Ireland is ancient. Civilization on the little island at the edge of the European continent dates back to 12,500 years ago. It goes without saying that such a long history has left its marks everywhere on the land. Ireland is full of ruins, of remains of past human settlements that have long outlived their primary inhabitants. The most common feature that we noticed during our Ireland road trip were the dry stone walls that line the meadows. Built as boundaries to delimit land property and fence off cattle, some of these dry stone walls can easily be a few centuries old. Continue reading

Best offbeat views of the Dingle peninsula

The tip of the Dingle peninsula is Ireland’s westernmost point. If that was not enough to make you want to go there, wait until you see my photos of that part of the emerald island. Less popular than the Ring of Kerry, Western Ireland’s most famous drive, the Dingle peninsula is rising in popularity. Two are the main reasons behind this. First, it’s a shorter drive than the Ring of Kerry. Second, despite being shorter it still encompasses some of the finest views of Ireland. Continue reading

Three meals in Northern Ireland

afternoon tea

Northern Ireland revealed itself as a food paradise to me. There hasn’t been one meal that I did not deeply enjoy while there. I only spent three days in Northern Ireland and I tried to eat out every time we could. Even when we had a lot of driving ahead and not enough time to fit in a proper lunch. This is when we usually make our sandwiches and eat them on the go. Even then I loved the local food. That cheddar, that bread… what’s not to love there? Continue reading

One autumn morning on the Giant’s Causeway

Visiting the Giant's Causeway one autumn morning.

A deserted beach made of massive basalt columns disappearing into the sea: the Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland. It was my favourite picture in a folder named “Ireland” in my old desktop. Many, many years ago, I was completely in love with Ireland. A genuine teenage obsession with the emerald island and its music, traditions, history. Out of all of the beautiful landscape images that filled that “Ireland” folder, the Giant’s Causeway one was by far my favourite. I dreamed about going there one day. Continue reading

A distillery tour of Ireland – exploring the world of Irish whiskey

There was a time in my life when whisky was just whisky. Actually, as the hibernophile that I am, I used to spell it whiskey, with an e. Even scotch or bourbon, it was all whiskey to me. In fact, I didn’t even know the difference between a scotch and a bourbon. Then I met my boyfriend and he happened to be a whisky person. A big whisky person (and notice the lack of the extra –e- I loved to use). One who will describe his favourite kind of whisky without even saying the word whisky (“Peated single malt”. Okaaaay.). Continue reading

The art of fika, a reunion in Stockholm

The art of fika in a Stockholm café

The first time I travelled to Stockholm with my boyfriend was during a long weekend in December some years ago. The city was packed with snow and Christmas lights and it was utterly romantic. It was also very cold, so cold that every now and then we felt the need to enter a café and order a hot drink to warm ourselves up from the inside out. What we did out of necessity, we discovered later to be also a very cultural thing in Sweden: the art of fika.
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How I took my dad to Trondheim (and what we ate)

trondheim norway

Trondheim is the third largest city in Norway. It’s not the capital, that’s Oslo. Nor is it the picturesque gateway to the fjords, Bergen. Trondheim is the one that comes after those two. Yet, for me, it was the first Scandinavian city I heard about. As a kid I learned that somewhere up there in northern Europe there was a city named Trondheim. Many years later I would have fallen in love with Norway and then even moved to Sweden, but back then my only knowledge of Scandinavia was that Trondheim was a city somewhere up there.

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A hipster taste of Krakow

Six months ago I wrote a post about my favourite eateries in Krakow and that post was an absolute win. I shared it around and heard back from friends visiting the Polish city that it had actually helped them more than random reviews on TripAdvisor. I guess that word of mouth from a friend, even though in the form of a blog post, is still perceived as pretty valuable advice. So I recently returned to Krakow for a wedding and decided to do it again and indulge in my favourite activity while in Krakow – eating out – for the sake of my blog. Continue reading

Of rotten sharks and supermarket food: eating in Iceland

During our road trip through southern and western Iceland, endless possibilities to sample unusual foods like local fish and puffin meat crossed our path, but oftentimes we had to discreetly back off as the sad truth is only one: eating in Iceland is horribly expensive. I know that that is part of the tourism system and I, as a visitor, should try to help the local economy as much as I can, but food – especially in restaurants – proved just so incredibly overpriced that I just couldn’t. Continue reading

My Iceland road trip – Snæfellsnes peninsula

Snæfellsnes peninsula and national park

After spending two nights in Reykjavík (and not taking advantage of its famous nightlife), we set off on the second portion of our road trip, this time driving up the West coast to the Snæfellsnes peninsula. Although this is doable as a daytrip from the capital, we decided to allow ourselves more time and spend one night in the area. We were prepared for bad weather, so two days seemed like a better option in case it became too bad to stay out with the camera. We did indeed experience all kinds of weather there: sun, snow, hailstorm, extreme wind. What we didn’t know (and we later learned) was that on that very night Iceland was transitioning from winter to summer.

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