A night at the ostrich farm Sahlins Struts in Borlänge

Say Dalarna and the mind pictures lush green forests, red wooden houses, lakes. Add the word animals and the horse, the famous Dala horse, might be the first to come to mind, followed by something wild like moose. Yet, among the tourist attractions that involve animals in Dalarna there is one that is a bit more unexpected. It’s a farm located just outside Borlänge that since 1994 has been herding ostriches: Sahlins Struts. Located on a property that has been owned by the same family for over a century, Sahlins Struts is more than just an ostrich farm. Continue reading

Where to eat Polish food in Krakow

So you find yourself in Krakow, the charming second largest city in Poland, and you wonder what it has to offer in terms of food. Krakow is very international and you can really find it all. From sushi to Mexican, from Italian to Ukrainian, Hungarian or even an American bakery, Krakow has it all. And it does not disappoint either when it comes to the local cuisine. You can find many options in town where you can sample authentic Polish food in Krakow, and in this post I am presenting an overview of some such eateries. These are all trusted places where I used to eat when I was an expat in Krakow, and love to recommend. Continue reading

Dining on the Baltic Sea: the Viking Line Buffet

Going on a cruise is synonym with many wonderful experiences, including some incredible food. Come sunset nothing beats the view of the sun sinking into the sea while indulging on some fine cruise foods and drinks. The cruises on the Baltic Sea are no exception and their restaurants offer a fantastic range of dining options while travelling on the Baltic Sea. I have recently been on a day cruise from Stockholm on Viking Cinderella and was awed at the new Viking Line Buffet. Onboard their ships, Viking Line serves a fantastic buffet that features carefully selected delicacies from the nordic cuisine in its most exquisite form: the smörgåsbord. Continue reading

Exploring Trieste’s food and coffee culture

The easternmost major city in northern Italy, Trieste lays on that thin stretch of Italian coastline squeezed between Slovenia and the Adriatic sea. Given its geographical position, Trieste’s food culture features layers of influences from the various worlds that converge there. The fishing tradition, the main element of the cuisine of a port city, is enriched with elements from the Slavic and Balkan as well as the Habsburg traditions. This makes Trieste’s culinary identity quite peculiar and unique in the rich panorama of the Italian cuisine. Continue reading

A fondue dinner at Romme Alpin’s Toppstugan

Fondueafton at Romme Alpin Toppstugan, a meat fondue dinner in Dalarna Sweden

Fondue dinners are a popular feature at ski resorts in Sweden. The alpine dish well suits the snowy atmosphere of Sweden in winter, especially when served in a skiing context. As you enjoy your fondue bourguignonne surrounded by the beautiful landscape of the Swedish winter you’d swear you’re in Switzerland. Very close to where I live in Dalarna there is the ski resort Romme Alpin. Their Toppstugan restaurant offers fondue nights (known as fondueafton) throughout the season, starting right after the restaurant stops serving Julbord, aka traditional Christmas dishes, a typical Advent menu. Continue reading

Irish food bucket list: while in Ireland eat like the Irish

Irish food: an ode to some of the best meals I had in Ireland

If you think that the only Irish food out there is potatoes, in this post I will try to change your mind. Please stay and read on. I spent a week travelling around Ireland and there hasn’t been one time that I wasn’t happy with what I ordered. And even if we have to narrow it down to the potatoes, they were delicious. But there is so much more. Ireland is a famed producer of beef and dairy, and while in Ireland I had really delicious meats and dairy products.

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Coffee culture in Sweden: Hedens Kaffe in Falun

Coffee culture in Sweden: Hedens Kaffe in Falun

Ever since I moved to Sweden I have become an avid coffee drinker. Sweden’s coffee culture was one of the first features I embraced. Sweden tops world coffee consumption statistics, ranking second only to neighbouring Finland. Coffee plays a crucial role in everyday life in Sweden. I remember how important the role of coffee breaks was at university here. Every couple of hours or so we would get a coffee break. It was sacred, there was no way we would not stop for coffee. Continue reading

Chasing ruins in Ireland: Churches, Castles and Cemeteries

Ireland is ancient. Civilization on the little island at the edge of the European continent dates back to 12,500 years ago. It goes without saying that such a long history has left its marks everywhere on the land. Ireland is full of ruins, of remains of past human settlements that have long outlived their primary inhabitants. The most common feature that we noticed during our Ireland road trip were the dry stone walls that line the meadows. Built as boundaries to delimit land property and fence off cattle, some of these dry stone walls can easily be a few centuries old. Continue reading

Autumn in Sweden: the Indian Summer in Stockholm

Autumn in Sweden can be a nasty time of the year. It rains a lot and the first frost always comes earlier than you’d expect. Darkness looms, days get dramatically shorter and the day after we move back the clocks I always feel jetlagged. Autumn in Sweden can be a real pain, yet some days I get to be reminded it still is my favourite season. Those days, when the sun is out, the crisp air is so thin and everything looks incredibly sharp. When such days occur Sweden turns the colours of its flag. Most of the trees display a glorious yellow foliage in the backdrop of that saturated blue sky that I love so much in Scandinavia. Continue reading

Best offbeat views of the Dingle peninsula

The tip of the Dingle peninsula is Ireland’s westernmost point. If that was not enough to make you want to go there, wait until you see my photos of that part of the emerald isle. Less popular than the Ring of Kerry, Western Ireland’s most famous drive, the Dingle peninsula is rising in popularity. Two are the main reasons behind this. First, it’s a shorter drive than the Ring of Kerry. Second, despite being shorter it still encompasses some of the finest views of Ireland. Continue reading